Don’t go away bitter, just go away!

Radio Sucks 400pxI’m going to ruffle a few feathers with this but I’ve always been a $#*! disturber, so why stop now. I saw a post from someone on Facebook recently. We’ve all seen these before, someone posts “Well, XYZ company just laid me off. After 38 years, I’m DONE with radio. This industry sucks! I hate it. This company is brutal. Radio is dying, get out now everyone!” And then all the past radio casualties have to post a comment and say “Radio sucks”, “All they care about is profits”, and reminisce about how glorious it used to be and other “back in my day” stuff. 

I find it ironic how easily they forget how it all started for them. They don’t remember when they got that very first job when they were 20 years old, fresh out of radio school. There’s a good chance they got that first gig because the person who had the job before them was let go. The company made a change, and let someone go, and this person was hired and benefitted from someone else’s misfortune. And if didn’t happen in their first job, then I guarantee at some point in their 38 year career, they eventually replaced a few other radio people who were shown the door, while they were on their way up the radio ladder. This industry has always had younger talent coming in and replacing the veterans who made too much money and didn’t do enough to earn it. Way back then, that person was a cost effective replacement, who showed a lot of potential, and management wanted to give them a chance. And they paid them every 2 weeks, for 38 years, to do their job. That was the arrangement. There was no guarantee. But now, they wouldn’t learn Instagram or Tic Toc, refused to supply content for the website or even participate in the stations podcasts. They stopped growing, stopped caring about radio and started complaining about how much more work they had to do now. And please don’t tell me anything about a company not being loyal, they were the one who quit one station and went across the street to the competition for that big pay day a few years back.

The Radio industry doesn’t owe them anything, in fact...THEY OWE RADIO! That Harley Davidson he loves to ride, that new video game console his son just got, those fancy clothes his daughter buys, his wife’s new jewelry and that house where all their  damn stuff lives...Radio bought all that stuff for him! And it’s not just the material things that radio has gotten for him. If he’s been in radio for 38 years, chances are almost ALL of his friends were either people he worked with in radio, or friends he met through radio. Maybe he even met his wife because he worked in radio, either with her or through another radio friend. And he’s bitter?

I’m not sure if his head has been in the sand for the last 13 months, but there’s a global pandemic going on. Business are closing, lots of them. Other people are losing jobs too. The businesses that are still open, are barely hanging on. Has he not seen all the “For Lease” signs on the buildings downtown? Radio advertising is down, there’s not as much money right now. People are having a hard time making ends meet. Radio companies are struggling too. 

There are millions of people that currently work at a job they absolutely hate every, single, day! They’d give their left arm to work in a business that’s as much fun as radio was, and is. And what about the people who don’t even have a job right now? And he’s complaining that his “fun” job of talking on the radio and playing music, that all his neighbors were so jealous about for almost 4 decades, is finally over?!? And let’s not even talk about the “package” he got when they walked him out the door. Good grief!

Yes! Radio is changing, it always has changed. Unless he just got let go from a station that still played Dragnet off of acetate records. It HAD to change. When TV came in, radio stopped playing those old radio shows and played started playing music. Radio survived when people could buy 8 tracks, cassettes and later CDs and listen to their own music in their car or at home instead of the radio. Radio survived when satellite radio started up, and later when the internet, YouTube, Spotify & Podcasts came on the scene. Radio has always, and WILL always survive, with or without him. And maybe, just maybe, his bitter attitude is one of the reasons he got let go in the first place. Actually, he should be thrilled he had a job that long if that’s the kind of attitude he had. 

So don’t go away bitter, just go away...and get off my lawn!

Comments (10)

This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

So you're venting about a guy...venting?
Who cares? Let him air his grievances. I assume you know who this person is? Because if you're just generalizing you're kind of coming across as a bully.
His 'Harley,' or 'daughter's fancy clothes' are purchased through money he EARNED while pushing his company's agenda and increasing their bottom line.
Don't make it sound like his f&*&ng company paid for that stuff. HE DID! Because he was employed by them.
The fact of the matter is, at least in the states, radio companies are shedding talent. Radio isn't dying but radio jobs ARE. There are mom and pop ownership out there, yes, but the vast majority of radio jobs are through companies like IHeartRadio, Cumulus, Entercom, etc. and these companies (especially during COVID) are finding new ways to provide content without adding jobs.
There will come a time, again in the states, when most on-air jobs will be done remotely and they'll be done by a few people.
There are those of us who DID adapt,...

So you're venting about a guy...venting?
Who cares? Let him air his grievances. I assume you know who this person is? Because if you're just generalizing you're kind of coming across as a bully.
His 'Harley,' or 'daughter's fancy clothes' are purchased through money he EARNED while pushing his company's agenda and increasing their bottom line.
Don't make it sound like his f&*&ng company paid for that stuff. HE DID! Because he was employed by them.
The fact of the matter is, at least in the states, radio companies are shedding talent. Radio isn't dying but radio jobs ARE. There are mom and pop ownership out there, yes, but the vast majority of radio jobs are through companies like IHeartRadio, Cumulus, Entercom, etc. and these companies (especially during COVID) are finding new ways to provide content without adding jobs.
There will come a time, again in the states, when most on-air jobs will be done remotely and they'll be done by a few people.
There are those of us who DID adapt, who did change, who did do podcasts for the group, who did interview sales clients because the sales manager wanted us to and we STILL got let go. Ratings? good, cost of our show? low.
I don't think you're aware of just how bad it is out there in radio.
I'm speaking from the context of radio in the US. I'm guessing it's different in Canada as there's different federal rules as it pertains to ownership in markets, etc. but it was only October/November that THOUSANDS were laid off.
I think letting a few of these people rage about a career identity being killed (and seeing the future prospects not look so good) is okay. I don't think anyone should be meant to feel ashamed that they were fired or didn't do enough to keep their jobs.

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Andy Warywoda
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No, if it were only one person, Richard would not have needed to even point it out. LOL. “ We’ve all seen these before, someone posts”, etc.

Generalizing is the opposite of bullying. I think some terms may have gotten reversed here. Logic please. Too much oversensitivity.

Don Elliot
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Yeah, I've read those too. And I've said the same. Every time there's a mass layoff. It's to be expected. People get emotional when they get laid off. Who doesn't? I like that you're seeing the silver lining in this business of ours. I do owe many of my closest friendships to radio. I met my wife through this industry. There are lots of positives for me personally.

Having said that, it is kind of a silly business if you like to see something tangible from your work. Entertainment is intangible and fleeting. As soon as you say something, it's out there in the ether, never to be heard again (aircheck sessions aside). It would be nice if the industry paid with that in mind, similar to, say pro football. But it doesn't.

There's a phrase that comes up in these situations that I feel needs debunking. And it's in defense of everything we do behind the mic. No doubt, people have said, "it's just business." I wholeheartedly disagree. Anyone who's been on the air or voiced a spot knows...

Yeah, I've read those too. And I've said the same. Every time there's a mass layoff. It's to be expected. People get emotional when they get laid off. Who doesn't? I like that you're seeing the silver lining in this business of ours. I do owe many of my closest friendships to radio. I met my wife through this industry. There are lots of positives for me personally.

Having said that, it is kind of a silly business if you like to see something tangible from your work. Entertainment is intangible and fleeting. As soon as you say something, it's out there in the ether, never to be heard again (aircheck sessions aside). It would be nice if the industry paid with that in mind, similar to, say pro football. But it doesn't.

There's a phrase that comes up in these situations that I feel needs debunking. And it's in defense of everything we do behind the mic. No doubt, people have said, "it's just business." I wholeheartedly disagree. Anyone who's been on the air or voiced a spot knows that you're putting the best version of YOU out there for everyone to consume. It is personal. That's ME on the air. That's ME on that endorsement spot. That's me standing in the parking lot of an empty shopping mall rousing up a crowd that's not there.

So when someone gets laid off, fired, RIFFED, whatever you want to call it, it hurts. The best we can do for our brothers and sisters is to be good shoulders for them to lean on. An encourager to help them find their way again.

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Michael Shishido
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Don, you can call me sensitive, that's fine.
But that doesn't discount that this 'article' was essentially a facebook post.
Where's the solutions?
Where's the suggestion of something else to parlay radio skills into?
Podcast
voiceover
There's 2 without really trying.
In this day in age of spilling negativity I think an article like this does more harm than good. Instead of 'hey how about those guys who complain about being laid off? They need to get over it and realize how thankful they should be because they got to kiss the ring of radio!'
Why not: 'You got laid off and you're mad about it? That sucks but ranting on Facebook isn't going to fix anything. Here's some suggestions....'
I mean the author's a teacher/professor, right?
Isn't he supposed to provide knowledge?
Also, there's a broad stroke here (read: generalizing) about someone getting laid off because they couldn't adapt. We all know that no matter how many hats you wear (on-air, production, creative lead, podcast,...

Don, you can call me sensitive, that's fine.
But that doesn't discount that this 'article' was essentially a facebook post.
Where's the solutions?
Where's the suggestion of something else to parlay radio skills into?
Podcast
voiceover
There's 2 without really trying.
In this day in age of spilling negativity I think an article like this does more harm than good. Instead of 'hey how about those guys who complain about being laid off? They need to get over it and realize how thankful they should be because they got to kiss the ring of radio!'
Why not: 'You got laid off and you're mad about it? That sucks but ranting on Facebook isn't going to fix anything. Here's some suggestions....'
I mean the author's a teacher/professor, right?
Isn't he supposed to provide knowledge?
Also, there's a broad stroke here (read: generalizing) about someone getting laid off because they couldn't adapt. We all know that no matter how many hats you wear (on-air, production, creative lead, podcast, social media guru, whatever) if the number next to your name on a spreadsheet is above a company's budget for the coming fiscal year: you're out.

Maybe it's as easy as this needs to be classified with the proper descripter, ie 'commentary', 'op-ed.'
Especially considering this is a publication that radio people turn to.
Does anyone edit these anyway? I'm asking because I'm not a regular reader so if 'Radio Sucks' is a regular 'ranting column,' apologies.

Mike, bravo on the 'it's just business' mention. I agree with you on that for sure but I'll take it a step further and add that it's personal because you're making decisions that affect people's lives. Not just their 'business' lives but their personal lives. As someone who was let go in October, I can tell you I've been more affected in my personal life than business life. They're intertwined, they always have been and they always will be. Anyone who ever says (when letting someone go) "It's not personal, it's just business," should be testing for sociopathy.

I don't want to seem like I'm trying to incite anything. I just genuinely think articles like this are a disservice to everyone.
Hugs

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Andy Warywoda
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So, some really want to place podcasts above or parallel to voiceover as an alternative revenue source, eh?

Podcasting? You really want to go there? Call Bob Pittman right away and he’ll show you how this fake-out works.

So you have $22 billion in debt and then in the face of the stock market, the public, and the business, you do the same thing as a Las Vegas magician on stage does… “Don’t look over there, look over here“. Lol.

Podcasts. Fun hobby if you’re independently wealthy, and the joke shops still sell rubber meat for people who have time to kill.

Ha. Show me the money.

In any rant we’re seeing here it’s been hard to determine the real source of frustration and insecurity.
But in the unlikely event of a water landing or possibly some underlying creative outlet need, you’re asking for a teacher to do your work for you? Do your own research and find your aptitude… Maybe do a voice coach, get an agent, do an improv class, try your hand (or feet) at stand up, or better...

So, some really want to place podcasts above or parallel to voiceover as an alternative revenue source, eh?

Podcasting? You really want to go there? Call Bob Pittman right away and he’ll show you how this fake-out works.

So you have $22 billion in debt and then in the face of the stock market, the public, and the business, you do the same thing as a Las Vegas magician on stage does… “Don’t look over there, look over here“. Lol.

Podcasts. Fun hobby if you’re independently wealthy, and the joke shops still sell rubber meat for people who have time to kill.

Ha. Show me the money.

In any rant we’re seeing here it’s been hard to determine the real source of frustration and insecurity.
But in the unlikely event of a water landing or possibly some underlying creative outlet need, you’re asking for a teacher to do your work for you? Do your own research and find your aptitude… Maybe do a voice coach, get an agent, do an improv class, try your hand (or feet) at stand up, or better yet, your mouth, play an instrument.

And in case it’s not obvious to the thickheaded, my “questions“ posed here are really rhetorical, not to a start back-and-forth whiney debate amongst galloping apprentice voiceover wannabes who can’t accept that v/o is a different business than Radio. I’m just offering solutions from experience, not invitations to engage.

Work on self-improvement which will expand your abilities and creativity, and you’ll also be ready for the next opportunity.

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Comment was last edited about 7 months ago by Jerry Vigil Don Elliot
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Thank you Don, Andy and Michael for not just reading the article, but also posting your comments. I really appreciate your take. Honestly, I wondered about even sending this "article/post/rant in to Jerry, or even having him publish it. (You can ask him). But like the first few lines said "I'm gonna ruffle a few feathers with this..."

Andy, yeah I do know the guy, and I sure didn't mean to come across like a bully. It was more of a "here we go again". I'm tired of hearing from people who refused to adapt to what radio/audio is now. OR did not see this end coming one day and prepare for it. You do bring up some GREAT points. Some I totally agree with, and some I don't. Yes, in Canada it might be very different, and yes, the jobs at each radio station are dwindling...but there are more radio stations than back in the "glory days". There are the same (or more) amount of jobs, but the jobs are different. You don't just do a morning show from 6-9am and go home. So, radio grads need to...

Thank you Don, Andy and Michael for not just reading the article, but also posting your comments. I really appreciate your take. Honestly, I wondered about even sending this "article/post/rant in to Jerry, or even having him publish it. (You can ask him). But like the first few lines said "I'm gonna ruffle a few feathers with this..."

Andy, yeah I do know the guy, and I sure didn't mean to come across like a bully. It was more of a "here we go again". I'm tired of hearing from people who refused to adapt to what radio/audio is now. OR did not see this end coming one day and prepare for it. You do bring up some GREAT points. Some I totally agree with, and some I don't. Yes, in Canada it might be very different, and yes, the jobs at each radio station are dwindling...but there are more radio stations than back in the "glory days". There are the same (or more) amount of jobs, but the jobs are different. You don't just do a morning show from 6-9am and go home. So, radio grads need to be able to write, produce, voice track, do voicer-overs, schedule music, etc...and this past year, do ALL OF IT from home. They are learning new skills like problem solving, technology challenges and equipment solutions, that the grad class from last year never had to learn. Plus, they have to participate in social media on top of everything else. And not just Facebook and Instagram, but Tik Tok, Snapchat, Clubhouse, Twitter Spaces, or Caffeine. And they are leaving schools with the talent to push aside the fossils who won't adapt/learn. Have a listen to some of the content I've posted from students in our program on "The Soundstage". My last two submission are from 1st year students, and they sound like medium market already. (Please go listen to them!) The "veterans" in larger markets who can't/won't learn these skills are being pushed aside by more qualified employees (who graduated 5 years ago and worked on those skills), and rightfully so. SOME of the vets can't do the job anymore, or won't for the same amount of money. My radio students are getting hired, year after year...well, at least the ones who are willing to go to Scrubwash, Saskatchewan for their first job. I apologize if any of the article made anyone feel ashamed for getting laid off. That was not the intent, at all. BUT, did they honestly not see it coming? Years ago? Did they not see people before them (older than them) get let go and think..."Maybe one day that'll be me?" This industry is not a lifelong profession for most people, even if it is a lifelong passion. Maybe it used to be where someone works until they are 65, but just cause someone has a great voice, doesn't mean they deserve a job.

Andy, you made a FANTASTIC point..."he's a teacher, should he not offer suggestions?" Yup, you're right. I should. And I will...next month. A follow up article is forthcoming, "What do we do now?"

Don, Michael...great points as well. It is an art form that we put "out there" to be consumed/enjoyed by our audience. Michael is right, it is personal, and maybe that's why it hurts so much. Our canvas, our stage has been taken away. BUT there are other avenues to display that creativity. Yup, podcasts are one avenue. But like Don says, how do you make money at it? There are billions of podcasts out there, and only a small percentage make enough to pay for the equipment they use to create that audio. Don, next month, I will offer some "suggestions" on what the next phase looks like for people who aren't in radio anymore. Stay tuned! (How's that for teasing the audience over the quater-hour for more ratings...LOL)

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Richard Stroobant
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“ There are the same (or more) amount of jobs [in radio], but the jobs are different. ”
Apparently the author has a stake in getting people to believe this, but it is SO far from the truth, I honestly don’t even know why I’m bothering to comment.

Rob Timm
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Hi Rob, it's too bad you didn't do any research (as I've done) before you commented. In my class, that's a re-do.

In Canada, in the 90's there were approximately 10,000 radio jobs. AND today? There are just over 10,000 jobs in radio. (I'm not good at math, but I think that's the same number?) The first link below shows there was about a 1% decrease in jobs in radio in the last 10 years. ONE PER CENT! Again, not good at math, but that's pretty close!

AND, yes the jobs are the same (or actually slightly increasing) in the States as well. Below in the link from the Bureau of Labor Statistics that says, there is a 1% percent increase in jobs expected in the next 10 years in this vocation.

And the number of radio stations in Canada are much more than in the 90's. Both in Canada...AND in the US.

SO...when the author (ME) says "there are the same amount of jobs (or more) in radio"...I guess I was right after all Rob! Thanks for coming out though, what do we have for him Jim!


https:...

Hi Rob, it's too bad you didn't do any research (as I've done) before you commented. In my class, that's a re-do.

In Canada, in the 90's there were approximately 10,000 radio jobs. AND today? There are just over 10,000 jobs in radio. (I'm not good at math, but I think that's the same number?) The first link below shows there was about a 1% decrease in jobs in radio in the last 10 years. ONE PER CENT! Again, not good at math, but that's pretty close!

AND, yes the jobs are the same (or actually slightly increasing) in the States as well. Below in the link from the Bureau of Labor Statistics that says, there is a 1% percent increase in jobs expected in the next 10 years in this vocation.

And the number of radio stations in Canada are much more than in the 90's. Both in Canada...AND in the US.

SO...when the author (ME) says "there are the same amount of jobs (or more) in radio"...I guess I was right after all Rob! Thanks for coming out though, what do we have for him Jim!


https://www.statista.com/statistics/481241/canada-radio-industry-weekly-average-employees/

https://www.jobbank.gc.ca/marketreport/outlook-occupation/16309/ca;jsessionid=3606621454FA1F7EB467D46DFAFB93E7.jobsearch75

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/announcers.htm

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Richard Stroobant
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Richard,
A re-do may in fact be called for, as it looks as if you've misinterpreted the BLS data, or merely failed to tab in further.
You neglected to note the difference between "announcers" (which can include working at Bingo halls & hockey rinks) and **BROADCAST announcers and radio disc jockeys**.
"Overall employment of announcers is projected to grow 1 percent from 2019 to 2029, slower than the average for all occupations...Employment of broadcast announcers and radio disk jockeys (DJs) is projected to decline 5 percent from 2019 to 2029. Continuing consolidation of radio and television stations will limit employment growth."
As the table at the bottom of the page very clearly shows, rather than your claimed 1% growth projection, the BLS estimates an 5% loss: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/announcers.htm#tab-6

I hit a pay wall on your Statista link, so can't check that.

Your jobbank link references the overly broad category of "Host/hostess - Television...

Richard,
A re-do may in fact be called for, as it looks as if you've misinterpreted the BLS data, or merely failed to tab in further.
You neglected to note the difference between "announcers" (which can include working at Bingo halls & hockey rinks) and **BROADCAST announcers and radio disc jockeys**.
"Overall employment of announcers is projected to grow 1 percent from 2019 to 2029, slower than the average for all occupations...Employment of broadcast announcers and radio disk jockeys (DJs) is projected to decline 5 percent from 2019 to 2029. Continuing consolidation of radio and television stations will limit employment growth."
As the table at the bottom of the page very clearly shows, rather than your claimed 1% growth projection, the BLS estimates an 5% loss: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/announcers.htm#tab-6

I hit a pay wall on your Statista link, so can't check that.

Your jobbank link references the overly broad category of "Host/hostess - Television Or Radio", rendering the data meaningless for the terms of this discussion. In fact none of your supporting data does anything of the kind. If the premise is "there are more jobs in radio", I have to wonder if your recent experience has been anything much more than academic.
https://www.ibisworld.com/industry-statistics/employment/radio-broadcasting-united-states/

I'm sorry, but upon further investigation, we won't be able to offer you that re-do. Though we are adding 5 points for consistency of style in a somewhat smarmy & quite condescending rebuttal (so un-Canadian!), your final grade is still just a D.

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Rob Timm
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Thanks for the reply Rob. As I mentioned...

1. The amount of Radio jobs in Canada (where my students are getting jobs) over the last 10 years is pretty flat (about a 1% decline). And that's ALL jobs in radio, not just announcing.
2. The amount of radio stations have increased in the last 10 years. (Less staff per station, but more radio stations in Canada)
3. The jobs ARE changing. Each position now has more responsibilities than it did 10 years ago.

So when I wrote, "There are the same (or more) amount of jobs, but the jobs are different", the line that you attacked...I was right.

So, I'll leave it at that. As you said...I honestly don't even know why I am bothering to comment. But, judging by your antagonist approach, I'm sure you'll want to have the last word.

At least if you wanna go call bingo games, you know you have the skills to do it. (Oh, my apologies...was the un-Canadian of me too?) I'm sorry! My advice Rob, go back and read the headline for the article. Have a...

Thanks for the reply Rob. As I mentioned...

1. The amount of Radio jobs in Canada (where my students are getting jobs) over the last 10 years is pretty flat (about a 1% decline). And that's ALL jobs in radio, not just announcing.
2. The amount of radio stations have increased in the last 10 years. (Less staff per station, but more radio stations in Canada)
3. The jobs ARE changing. Each position now has more responsibilities than it did 10 years ago.

So when I wrote, "There are the same (or more) amount of jobs, but the jobs are different", the line that you attacked...I was right.

So, I'll leave it at that. As you said...I honestly don't even know why I am bothering to comment. But, judging by your antagonist approach, I'm sure you'll want to have the last word.

At least if you wanna go call bingo games, you know you have the skills to do it. (Oh, my apologies...was the un-Canadian of me too?) I'm sorry! My advice Rob, go back and read the headline for the article. Have a nice day!

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Richard Stroobant
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